An Overview of Study Resources for English Literature Students

If you’re an English major or a student studying English literature and you’re looking for online resources to help you study better or give the information you need to complete your essay, assignment, or paper, then look no further. We have put together a list of English literature study resources online just for you! 

Here are some helpful study resources for English literature students: 

 

Websites: 

Google Books: Google Books lets you access several books and magazines online. Many fiction and non-fiction books are made available online on Google Books by publishers for free. Also, the Library Project by Google allows users to access rare or out of print books that aren’t usually available outside of the library system. 

Bartleby: Bartleby’s literature guides provide a comprehensive, cover-to-cover literary analysis. Be it classic or contemporary literature, the guides cover background, characters, themes, quotes, and other critical literary components you may want to know about or need help with. 

Poet Seers: Be it poems by American poets, European poets, Women poets, Victorian poets, or poets belonging to different time periods or geographies, Poet Seers has it all. Poet Seers is an exhaustive collection of poetry by poets from around the world. 

 

YouTube Channels: 

CrashCourse: This is an educational channel which was started by brothers John and Hank Green. Hosted by John Green, who also happens to be a novelist, the Literature series on CrashCourse is highly informative and useful especially if you’re a literature student studying classics like The Odyssey. 

Overly Sarcastic Productions: This channel is a laugh riot! They can even make a lesson on serious classics like The Iliad fun! Started by content creators who call themselves Red and Blue, this channel makes educational videos which are entertaining and enlightening. 

 

Podcasts: 

Didion, Hawthorne, and the In-Between (DH&I): Hosted by Mackenzie Gentz, this podcast’s main aim is to, as their website states, “make literature more accessible to modern audiences”. From classics like ‘The Taming of the Shrew’ (1590) to more recent ‘Talking to Strangers’ (2019), this podcast thoroughly explores literature old and new. 

Literally Literary: This podcast is a project of Humanities Collaborative at EPCC-UTEP and the Papagayo Project which discusses and analyzes novels, poetry, short stories, and various genres of literature. 

The History of Literature: Hosted by Jacke Wilson, this podcast discusses ancient epics, contemporary classics, and everything in between.

Besides these useful resources, there are various discussion threads that discuss literature on forums like Quora and  Reddit through which you can reach out to peers, seniors, professors, or language experts who can help you by answering questions on anything and everything related to literature. 

 

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